Tag Archives: Diabetes

Can The Sugar And Shake Your Cravings…


There are times when too much of a good thing can be great and then there are times when it is simply excessive. The occasional Starbucks tea and ginger biscuit had become a daily habit. So it was that I found myself reaching for  Sarah Wilson’s ‘I Quit Sugar’ book and started on the program. That was ten days ago.

I Quit Sugar - Sarah Wilson (photo - worklondonstyle)

I Quit Sugar – Sarah Wilson (photo – worklondonstyle)

Recent health reports have shown a marked increase in earlier onset of diabetes type 2 and heart disease. Research suggests that sugar may be the culprit and that it may be as addictive as cocaine whilst being as harmful as tobacco.

Sarah Wilson, a former editor of Australian Cosmopolitan, wrote about her research and personal experience on a low sugar program to treat her auto-immune disease. Her e-book turned into the New York Times bestseller ‘I Quit Sugar’.

Sarah says, “Quitting sugar is about eating the way we did before the age of industrial sugar. A hundred years ago we ate 1 kg of sugar a year – now we eat 60kg a year.”

Crowd out added sugar by loading up on nutritionally dense foods. (photo - worklondonstyle)

Crowd out added sugar by loading up on nutritionally dense foods. (photo – worklondonstyle)

One teaspoon of sugar = 4.2g. The World Health Organisation has recently updated guidelines for daily intake from 40g per day down to 20g (5 teaspoons). What you are actively looking to reduce is fructose, which converts directly to fat. It inhibits the immune system, upsets the mineral balance and is linked to early ageing and dementia.

Get started now:
1) replace sugar with healthy fats and protein
2) use the right oils and spreads – avoid all polyunsaturated fats such as sunflower oil and switch to organic butter and coconut oil instead
3) drink lots of water – at least two litres a day
4) do some exercise every day – 30 to 60 minutes
5) learn to read labels – choose foods with less that 5g of sugar per 100g.

Sarah devised an 8 week program to kick the sugar habit for good. Foods that are particularly helpful include coconut oil, cacao, cheese, chicken, chai tea, chia seeds, cinnamon, coconut water and coffee.

I Quit Sugar for Life - Sarah Wilson (photo - worklondonstyle)

I Quit Sugar for Life – Sarah Wilson (photo – worklondonstyle)

What to expect:
I went cold turkey and suffered withdrawal symptoms with flu-like muscle aches and headaches for the first 3 days. I persisted and less than two weeks into the program I am enjoying heightened energy levels, radiant skin and a better night’s sleep. I eat exactly what I want with an emphasis on organic vegetables and protein and am happy to say that I no longer crave the sweet stuff.

This is not a diet, it is a way of living without processed food. Three years from when she first started, Sarah’s new book ‘I Quit Sugar for Life’ is released in the UK this week.

Are You Sitting Down?


Sit! This basic command to the family pet is one often exercised for extensive periods by the rest of the family at home, school or the office. “Sitting is the new smoking”, says Anup Kanodia; physician and researcher at the Centre For Personalised Health Care at Ohio State University’s Wexner Medical Centre.

Reading, my greatest joy, can often keep me grounded for hours at a time. (photo -  worklondonstyle)

Reading, my greatest joy, can often keep me grounded for hours at a time. (photo – worklondonstyle)

An Australian study published in the British Journal of Sports Medicine in October 2012 stated that every one hour of  sitting watching TV, reduces a person’s life by 22 minutes, whilst every cigarette shortens a smoker’s life by about 11 minutes.

“The chair is out to kill us,” States James Levine, an endocrinologist at the Mayo Graduate School of Medicine. In the UK physical inactivity is responsible for 17% of early deaths. It is an international epidemic, causing 6% of deaths around the world, making it one of the top four global killers. It can shorten life expectancy by three to five years.

Striding down Regent Street, London. (photo - worklondonstyle)

Striding down Regent Street, London. (photo – worklondonstyle)

The cure for physical inactivity could be as simple as walking. It costs nothing and it’s health benefits are proven. It can reduce the risk from heart disease to breast cancer. All it takes is a little self motivation and determination. With some planning it can be done anywhere in all weather.

My sister's dog, Milo, taking me for a run on a recent holiday in Cape Town.

My sister’s dog, Milo, taking me for a run on a recent holiday in Cape Town.

Sitting still burns very few calories and can pile on the pounds over time. Levine States that a person with a desk job may burn 300 calories a day at work whilst the same person might burn 2,300 per day in a job that requires considerable physical output. Sitting can lead to insulin resistance and suppress the production of lipase, which is essential for turning bad cholesterol into good. Thus the link between prolonged sitting, diabetes and heart disease.

Saturday afternoon walking along the South Bank. (photo - worklondonsyle)

Saturday afternoon walking along the South Bank. (photo – worklondonsyle)

What to do if your job calls for many hours of staying seated? A study published in Diabetes Care last year showed you can improve your glucose metabolism with a two minute walk every 20 minutes. It is recommended that people engage in 150 minutes per week of moderate intensity physical activity. This is equivalent to 30 minutes each day, 5 times per week.

Sunday afternoon in Richmond park. Sunshine and the luxury of more time calls for a faster pace and longer distance. (photo - worklondonstyle)

Sunday afternoon in Richmond park. Sunshine and the luxury of more time call for a faster pace and longer distance. (photo – worklondonstyle)

Dr Hannah Bridges, senior information officer at Breakthrough Breast Cancer says, “Any activity that raises your pulse reduces your risk – so regular brisk walks are an easy and free way to get active.”